GoGreen Seattle 2015 ‘Call for Proposals:’ Submissions Wanted from Business: Transportation, Smart Cities, Social Science

GGSEA15_WebHeaderRequesting your expertise! GoGreen Seattle has announced their 2015 Call for Proposals to the business community, to build the GoGreen Seattle Conference program on April 30. Input from this call will shape the theme, topics covered and speakers showcased at our 6th annual conference.

GoGreen Seattle is looking for business’ cutting edge ideas and best practice examples for Case Studies, Panel Discussions, Industry Showcase, Solutions Labs, How-To Workshops, Unconference, Mini-Charette and Storytelling sessions for the 2015 program. The deadline for program proposal submissions is Friday, December 12, 2014. You can view our Call for Proposal Guidelines here.

Topics of interest for submissions include:

Transportation/Clean Mobility

  • Examples:
    o Trends in Transportation
    o Transportation and Millennials
    o Sharing Economy and Transportation
    o Rethinking Public Transportation
    o Successful Employer Transportation Programs o Commute Trip Reduction
    o Clean Fleets
    o Alternative Fuels
    o Infrastructure/Land Use

Smart Cities

  • Examples:
    o Cities for People
    o Smart and Competitive Cities
    o Moving Beyond Incrementalism

Environmental Science

  • Examples:
    o Future Predictions
    o Climate Change
    o Life Cycle Assessment

Social Science

  • Examples:
    o Tools for shifting values and actions in the workplace o Employee engagement
    o Leadership buy-in
    o The Psychology of Sustainability
    o How to lead radical change with out-of-box innovation o Fast Tracking Change

Practical Tools

  • Examples:
    o Comprehensive benchmarking
    o Contractor improvement projects
    o Energy audits/storage
    o Equity assessment
    o Sustainable purchasing/procurement process o Waste sorts

Equity/Success Stories

  • Examples:
    o Equity Empowerment Training
    o Achieving Equity in the workplace o Collaboration and partnerships
    o Supporting the local community o Connecting communities

Business Innovation

  • Examples:
    o Key Components to Workplace Innovation
    o Future Supply Chain Management
    o New Business Opportunities in Sustainability
    o Impact Investing
    o Shared Economy
    o Upcycling
    o GRI Reporting
    o Innovation Incubation
    o Technology Innovation
    o Carbon Reduction – Moving Beyond Incrementalism

GoGreen Seattle 2015
Thursday, April 30
The Conference Center | Eighth Avenue at Pike Street

Register today at early bird rates!

Whale Trail Presents Discussion On A Protected Zone for Puget Sound Orcas

Protected Orca Zone posterThe Whale Trail will present the ideas behind “A Protected Zone for Puget Sound Orcas,” a presentation by Bruce Stedman, of Orca Relief, on Thursday, October 30, from 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm at C&P Coffee, 5612 California Ave SW.  There is a five dollar ($5) suggested donation, kids free!
Tickets are available from brownpapertickets.com. The event is presented by The Whale Trail and will feature additional speakers on harbor seals and clean-up efforts for the Sound.

The Southern Resident Killer Whales are endangered and seriously declining; their 2014 population of 79 is the lowest since 1985.  To aid their recovery, Orca Relief is urging NOAA Fisheries to conduct a public process that will result in a Whale Protection Zone for the Southern Resident Killer Whales.

A well designed and enforced WPZ would provide the Southern Resident Orca a safe-haven in the very core of their critical habitat, and a relief from vessel impacts including noise, disturbance and air pollution. Bruce Stedman, Executive Director of Orca Relief will describe the key aspects of how a protected area for the Orca should be developed and how it could help the SRKWs begin to recover.

Join us to hear the latest about the orcas, and updates from Robin Lindsay (Seal Sitters), and Diver Laura James (tox-ick.org). This is the first in a new series of Orca Talks hosted by The Whale Trail in West Seattle.

Buy tickets ahead of time and we’ll save you a seat! And hurry – this will likely sell out.
About the Presenter
The Executive Director of Orca Relief Citizens’ Alliance, Bruce Stedman has more than three decades of experience in marine conservation, ocean health issues, and whale conservation.  He was one of the core team that built the Whale Museum (Friday Harbor, WA) and was its first curator.
He has directed five other conservation and environmental organizations, as well as working as an environmental mediator for 15 years.  He has facilitated or mediated more than 100 decision-making or information-sharing processes on many environmental topics, and designed/conducted more than 55 workshops or study tours for public officials and technical specialists from over 40 countries. Trained at University of Washington and MIT, Mr. Stedman has taught conservation and environmental courses at Harvard, MIT, Tufts, and Western Washington Universities.
About The Whale Trail
The Whale Trail (www.thewhaletrail.org) is a series of sites around the region where the public may view orcas and other marine mammals from shore. The mission is to inspire appreciation and stewardship of whales and our marine environment by establishing a network of viewing sites along the whales’ trails through the Salish Sea and the coastal waters of the Pacific Northwest. The goals are to increase awareness that our marine waters are home to orcas and other species; connect visitors to orcas, other marine wildlife and their habitat; inspire stewardship and build community; promote land-based whale watching. The Whale Trail’s over-arching goal is to ensure the southern resident orcas do not go extinct.

The Whale Trail provides simple, powerful, and long-lasting reminders to visitors and residents alike that orcas and other whales live in our waters.  Through the current sites and signs, including two on every Washington State ferry, Whale Trail reaches more than 22 million people each year. They are currently adding sites from BC to California, throughout the southern resident orcas’ range.

The Whale Trail is led by a core team of partners including NOAA Fisheries, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Seattle Aquarium, the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, and the Whale Museum. The Whale Trail is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, registered in Washington State. Join us!

West Duwamish Trail To Be Improved Through North End of South Park

Screen Shot 2014-10-19 at 10.54.59 amImproving the West Duwamish Trail will cause closures of Fifth Avenue S and S Portland Street in South Park for a period of several days beginning Monday, October 20. The street improvements will include paving and drainage.

The Seattle Department of Transportation will close the intersection of Fifth Avenue S and S Portland Street in the South Park neighborhood to vehicular traffic starting Monday, Oct. 20 for approximately two to three days.

Traffic on Fifth Avenue South between South Holden and South Kenyon streets will be restricted to local access 24 hours per day.  A detour route using Seventh Avenue South will be available.

SDOT is constructing an extension to the West Duwamish Trail on the south side of S Portland Street from West Marginal Way S to Eighth Avenue S.  The project also includes installation of a new storm drainage system and new paving on S Portland Street.

Work on this project began in July and is expected to be completed by the end of the year, weather permitting.

 

Open House for West Seattle and Burien Solar Homes Saturday

Homes north of West Seattle Elementary School which have solar installed.

Home owners in West Seattle and Burien neighborhoods are preparing to show their solar homes as part of the National American Energy Solar Tour on Saturday, October 4 from 12:00 noon to 4:00 pm.  It is a golden opportunity for curious folks interested in solar energy to view projects first hand, see how they are working, and talk to the owners and installers.  

To find tour sites go to http://www.ases.org/solar-tour/find-a-tour/ or www.solarwa.org.  The web site has addresses, most of the sites are a within 15 min drive between the north part of West Seattle to Burien.  

Pam Burton and Jeremy Smithson, owners of Puget Sound Solar, will be available for answering questions at the home of Cindy Jennings, 2205 41st Ave SW. For more information or questions call 206-402-6926.

Tour map direct linkhttps://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/viewer?mid=zieH_jH3zMLg.kA1ko0WXVdcI

Green Go Solar Teaching Rural Baja To Make Solar Panels, Helping Out After Hurricane Odile, Could Use Funds Help

BajaCrewWorkingThe Green Go Solar project is helping out in Baja, Mexico.  Many residents of rural Baja have no or very limited access to electricity and Green Go Solar has been working to change this.

Baja has a tremendous solar resource yet solar panels can be overly expensive and distant for many. This keeps solar technology out of financial/logistical reach for many, leaving them without access to electricity. Many residents of the outlying fishing and ranching communities have resigned to living completely without power.

In addition, hurricane Odile ravaged the Baja peninsula on September 14th and 15th of this year. As a category 3 hurricane, it blew 140 mph winds and dropped some 14 inches of rain in places causing widespread and dangerous flooding. It was the strongest hurricane to hit Baja peninsula in the satellite era. It left thousands homeless and desperate in its wake. This will increase the gap in access to electricity for years.

An organization is trying to change this situation by empowering local communities to create or rebuild their own renewable power in Baja, Mexico with affordable DIY solar panels.

inside GreenGoSolar trailerThe Green Go Solar Project teaches people how to build their own solar panels, mostly from everyday household materials.  The hands-on teaching process provides education in the basics of solar/photovoltaic technology for residents and visitors alike. The organization is demonstrating that solar is a viable and affordable alternative to running a generator or burning tires, with the end-goal of providing locally built electric power to people without light.

The project was founded in 2008 by Keith Bonarrigo soon after he arrived in San Juanico, Baja Sur, Mexico.  Keith is a surfer and was drawn by the legendary wave in “Scorpion Bay” (as it known amongst surfers). Upon arrival he was captured by the local culture and geographic beauty.  He also recognized the notable need for accessible and affordable power, and began to strategize a way to bring this technology to the area.

Green Go Solar is also trying to raise funds to provide more storm area workshop material, to help repair the pickup vehicle they use, to get more tools for the workshop students, and to provide a more sustainable local bathroom.  You can help by contributing at their IndeGoGo funding site.

cosmetic issue solar panel

Solar Cell Solution

The solution lay in what could be considered a waste product of the solar industry; all cells used in these workshops are cosmetic rejects from the solar cell production process. The solar cell fabrication process produces perfectly functional but cosmetically imperfect solar cells which are not used in retail-grade panels. These cells are sometimes destroyed or broken down at the factory, consuming time, energy, and resources. When the cosmetic defect in question is slight, the cells can also be purchased in bulk for pennies on the dollar. The project acquires and imports these B/C-grade solar cells and puts them to work.  The solar cells are used as a vocational resource to illustrate basic electric principles critical to the design, construction, maintenance, and expansion of any solar system of any size.

Solar panel prototypes were built using this material and methodology. They were installed for field testing, leading to the evolution of their concept and designs over time. The panels lasted, proving themselves to be functional over a period of years, and the process has led to further improvements in both methods and materials.

working on panel

Workshop Approach

Workshop students test the electrical integrity of these solar cells and then connect them together into strings for a larger, pre-calculated electrical output. Students are taught construction methods to create custom housing structures to protect the contents from the harsh Baja environment. They ultimately assembled  all this to comprise a fully-functional solar panel.  Teaching methods put an emphasis on the re-use of regular household materials for panel construction to reduce the amount of material going into landfills, and to generally encourage the idea of recycling.

The methods, materials, and tools employed by the group are specifically tailored to meet local challenges.  Everything needed for a DIY solar panel is within the economic and physical reach of any resident of this remote area.  The most common panel construction method used in the workshops results in a solar panel that produces about 80-90 watts of power for roughly 650 pesos (+-$50 U.S. dollars) of solar material. This same amount of solar power in a commercially manufactured panel is currently available for roughly 6500 pesos ($350 dollars) in the nearest outlet, the B.C.S. capital of La Paz, located about 6 hours away from the project’s base. Solar workshops are conducted based on the working schedules of local people, as fisherman and ranchers can have quite varied day-to-day routines – oftentimes based on environmental factors like tides or rain. Workshops are scheduled based on these factors and communal feedback in an attempt to run during downtime in many local’s lives. This enables workshop students to keep lost potential work time to a minimum, which allows them to keep their family finances working.

Green Go Solar panelTrained Students Have Solar Skills

Upon completion of the workshop, all solar students are provided with solar cells, wire, and a diode to build their own solar panel. The workshop usually takes 1-2 days, including hands-on instruction in solar system design and sizing as well as battery maintenance.

After the initial panel build, the workshop group normally identifies a family, business or institution in need.  A modest solar system is designed for the site selected, based on their estimated energy consumption.  The system is installed and the panel is put to work, creating renewable power for the local community, and a practical demonstration of DIY solar at work.

The group has built and maintains a base vocational facility known as “el Rancho Solar” which they open to the public to learn to build and run solar power. A renovated Airstream trailer serves as the workspace for the workshops themselves, as well as a tool library. The doors are open for general public interface for any kind of guidance/advice to help solar students succeed.

Since the inception of the project, the success rate has been high and local interest has grown rapidly. Interest from surrounding areas has spawned the development of a mobile workshop program where the material and methods are brought to surrounding areas and taught there.

Baja gangIn addition to the solar experience, students of the project are encouraged to enjoy the incredible natural playground that Baja has to offer:

San Juanico Is Beautiful

San Juanico is nestled between the beautiful Pacific coast and the rugged San Pedro Mountains on the Baja California peninsula.  Its remote location has kept this a slow-paced fishing village, which continues to offer an escape in a tranquil setting. The town sits on a pristine bay with a rich and vibrant marine ecosystem.  It has long been known by surfers as the legendary “Scorpion Bay” for its incredible point breaks.  This location provides one of the best waves to learn to surf on in the world, excellent fishing, snorkeling, tide-pooling, and a vast desert expanse which makes for miles and miles of wide-open ATV/moto touring.  Nearby Laguna San Ignacio offers up-close whale watching experiences unlike any other (and has served as another test-base for the solar project). The project encourages and emphasizes responsible appreciation of the surrounding environment so it can continue to serve as a constant reminder of the benefits of preserving these beautiful natural resources.

Surfboards, fishing/snorkeling gear, and motorcycles/ATVs can be made available for solar students through the Green Go Solar Project’s workshop facility, known as “El Rancho Solar” or available for daily/hourly rental at the nearby Burro En Primavera restaurant and bar.

There are several options for accommodations in San Juanico, ranging from free beach camping or trailers at the project workshop facility to affordable local hotels/casitas and local rooms/houses for rent.

Please see http://greengosolar.org for more information on the organization, accommodations, and upcoming workshop/events schedule.

Keith Bonarrigo and student in front of Baja work trailer.

Keith Bonarrigo and student in front of Baja work trailer.

Pathfinder K-8 School Has New 2500-gallon Cistern for Earth Project Garden

pathfinder cistern

Sustainable West Seattle is excited to announce the completion of a new 2500-gallon rainwater harvesting system at Pathfinder K-8 school that will be used to irrigate its  extensive school garden.  SWS was a significant part of this project, donating volunteer labor through school parent Bill Reiswig and through a small grant from SWS’s storm water project Tox-ick.org.

The newly-installed system harvests rainwater that falls on the metal roof of the school and stores it for future use.  It has a 50+ gallon first-flush feature that removes potential pollutants from the water, and features an irrigation line that runs to a conveniently located hose-bib.  The system is gravity-pressurized at this time, but could be modified in the future with a solar-powered pump.

The rainwater system is an essential piece in the growing Pathfinder school garden.  The garden is designed with ecological principles and this system reflects that.   Water harvested from the roof diverts stormwater from the City of Seattle’s sewer system, saves money and uses local water rather than water moved from a great distance.  Water harvested in the winter and spring by this system can water vegetables grown in Seattle’s dry summers.  The rainwater system represents a great learning opportunity for students in understanding our water cycle, the mathematics of rate and flow, and the ecological principles involved.

This system reflects the work of teachers, parents, and students thru Pathfinders Pathfinder’s K-8 “Earth Project”.  The Earth Project  is a collaboration between local non-profit Nature Consortium and Pathfinder teachers, parents, and greater community.

Bill Reiswig, Bruce Hostedder and Patrick Loderhose (both of EarthSystems NW) by the cistern they installed at Pathfinder School.

Bill Reiswig, Bruce Hostedder and Patrick Loderhose (both of EarthSystems NW) by the cistern they installed at Pathfinder School.

The project was funded through small garden and water grants from BECU, Whole Foods, and from local non-profit Sustainable West Seattle and it’s Tox-ick stormwater project.

The system was designed and installed by EarthSystems NW, who offer innovative and economical ideas for conserving and harnessing our most vital resource: water.

Bill Reiswig, Bruce Hostedder and Patrick Loderhose (both ESNW) installed the sytem in 5 days of work during the past couple of weeks.  It is being recieved with excitement by the school, students and teachers.

Seattle Parks Offers Challenge Course Facilitator Training @ Camp Long

camplong_upsidedownSeattle Parks to offer ‘challenge course’ facilitator training at Camp Long

Seattle Parks and Recreation worked with Washington State University Extension 4-H to build a “challenge course” in the trees in West Seattle’s Camp Long. This fall, interested members of the public are invited to join other educators and counselors in learning how to use adventure education to promote team building and personal development in their communities.

The introduction to facilitator training takes place Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 18-19, 8:30 am to 5:00 pm. The cost is $160. The low course facilitator training takes place Wednesday evenings, Oct. 22 and 29, 5 to 9 pm. and Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 1-2, 8:30 am. to 5:00 pm. The cost is $240. The high course facilitator training takes place Friday through Sunday, Nov. 14-16, 8:30 am. to 5:00 pm. The cost is $240. The training location is 5200 35th Ave SW at Camp Long in West Seattle. Camping is available during the training.

After successful completion of the training, participants will be able to facilitate events at the Camp Long challenge course. The course is designed to meet the 4-H certification requirements to host and facilitate group activities at Camp Long. Certified facilitators receive reduced rates when bringing their own groups. The trainings are designed to sequence together.

At the Camp Long course, several elements of the ropes course are integrated into the forested areas. WSU 4–H, through 30 years of adventure education experience, has developed curricula that strengthen critical life skills including decision making, self-confidence, positive risk taking, self-esteem, teamwork, and leadership.

For more information and to sign up for the challenge course training, please contact Challenge Course Manager Ken Turner at 206-684-7434 or keno.turner@seattle.gov.

Camp Long is one of Seattle’s best kept secrets. Located in West Seattle, this 68-acre oasis in the city offers visitors an opportunity to enjoy nature, hike in the forest, camp overnight in rustic cabins, rock climb, learn about natural history, and visit or rent the rustic Lodge. For more information, see http://www.seattle.gov/parks/environment/camplong.htm.

 

Washington Environmental Council Initiates Petition Drive for Change

WEClogoThe Washington Environmental Council has initiated a petition gathering effort in the state to support change.  According to WEC, the climate movement in the Pacific Northwest is growing faster than ever, just last week, Oregon denied a key permit for a proposed coal export terminal, a big success for the health of the PNW. And this weekend, September 2o, is the largest rally for climate ever in New York City, with hundreds of solidarity events happening around the nation with many in Washington.

To build on this momentum, Washington Environmental Council announced the launch of their petition gathering effort.  WEC says our legislators need to see the energy and hear the calls for climate action in Washington, sothey are working to collect 50,000 signatures from citizens across Washington state. With your help, Governor Inslee and our legislators will see the support and hear the strong call to action that our communities want.

Go to their web and sign up or use their templates to send email to your legislators.

  1. Schedule an email to your Washington members for next week, Sept 22 – Sept 26.
  2. Choose an email template and adapt/personalize it if you’d like to incorporate more of your organization’s voice. WEC encourages you to use the first version which builds off the energy from this weekend’s climate march.

Learn Sustainable Garden & Water Management Practices @ UW Botanic Center Classes

UW Botanic GardenLandscape for Life™ demystifies sustainability for home gardeners

The University of Washington Botanic Gardens is hosting four Thursday evening classes on sustainable garden practices and water management.  The classes are on Thursday, September 25  through October 16, and start at 6:30 pm and end at 9:00 pm.

Are you a homeowner who wants to create and maintain your own healthy, sustainable landscape? Through instructor-led presentations, class discussions, and activities, you will deepen your understanding of how to get the most out of water in your garden, how to build healthy soils with minimal outside inputs, how to use native and climate-adapted plants for the Pacific Northwest, and how to find the most environmentally-friendly landscape materials. Students will analyze their own home landscape focusing on soils, water, plants, and use of materials. Landscape for LifeTM was developed by the US Botanical Garden and Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center to the University of Texas in Austin.

There is a cost, $125 before September 19, and $150 after. You can Register Online or call 206-685-8033 to register.

The classes will be taught by instructor Barbara DeCaro, a horticulturist working for Seattle Parks and Recreation. She develops best practices for managing public landscapes and provides training programs in landscape management for parks staff. She is a certified Instructor for Landscape for LifeTM and also develops teaching materials and provides instruction for the landscape industry in the ecoPRO – Sustainable Landscape Professional Program. Barbara is a life-long gardener and life-long learner, with over 40 years working in public gardens and landscapes.[mappress mapid=”539″]

Arts & Culture $1200 Community Grants Open to Art Councils, Festivals & Events

ArtsCulturePhotoThe Office of Arts & Culture‘s Neighborhood & Community Arts program helps Seattle’s neighborhood arts councils and community-based groups produce festivals and events that enhance the visibility of neighborhoods, promote cultural participation, celebrate diversity and build community through arts and culture.

In 2014, the program provided $1,200 each to 42 organizations to support annual public festivals and events.

ELIGIBILITY

Neighborhood arts councils and community-based groups may seek support for a recurring festival or event that has been in existence for at least one year, has a significant arts and cultural component, is open to the public and takes place in Seattle. Applicants do not have to have 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status.

FUNDING

Funded organizations will receive two (2) years of funding support (for events in 2015 and 2016) of $1,200 per year to support direct project expenses: artist fees, marketing and promotional fees, project management and personnel costs, supplies, equipment rentals or other production-related costs.

DEADLINE

The deadline for applicants is 11:00 pm, Wednesday, October 22, 2014, Pacific Daylight Time. To apply, click here and fill out the online application. 

There will be an information session on Wednesday, September 10, 6:30 to 7:30 pm at the
2100 Building, [mappress mapid=”538″], Seattle. Attend the session and pick up pointers on putting together an effective application. To reserve a seat, RSVP to Jenny Crooks, 206-684-7084, by Monday, September 8.