Intro to Backyard Booze @ The Tool Library

Introduction to Backyard Booze
Tuesday, Dec. 6th, 7-9 PM

Learn to use fruit and simple ingredients to make homemade specialty liqueurs such as Fig Bourbon, Rumtopf, Cranberry Spice Vodka, or Pineapple Rum. This class might serve as a precursor to a proposed distilling class in the Spring.
Instructor: Vanessa Primer
Cost: $20
Register Now!

Intro to Backyard Booze is the second class in the Tool Library’s Homemade for the Holidays series. From soap making to homemade liqueurs, from basic jewelry design to easy canning, The Tool Library hopes to offer you a number of ways to make handcrafted goods at home in the spirit of a do-it-yourself holiday season.

All classes are held Tuesday evenings at the West Seattle Tool Library workshop at Youngstown Cultural Arts Center, 4408 Delridge Way SW.

Intro to Holiday Canning @ The Tool Library

Introduction to Holiday Canning
Tuesday, Nov. 29th, 7-9 PM
Learn how to preserve your harvest. We’ll cover all the basics of using a hot water bath canner. Each participant will get to take home a few jars of what we can in class.
Instructor: Christina Hahs
Cost: $20 plus $5 for materials
Register Now!

Intro to Canning is the first class in the Tool Library’s Homemade for the Holidays series. From soap making to homemade liqueurs, from basic jewelry design to easy canning, The Tool Library hopes to offer you a number of ways to make handcrafted goods at home in the spirit of a do-it-yourself holiday season.

All classes are held Tuesday evenings at the West Seattle Tool Library workshop at Youngstown Cultural Arts Center, 4408 Delridge Way SW.

Duwamish Native Holiday Gift Fair Weekend @ Longhouse

Duwamish Tribe Celebrates Native American Heritage Day & Month with Native Holiday Gift Fair.

The Duwamish Tribe invites its West Seattle neighbors to its Longhouse Thanksgiving weekend for a Native Holiday Gift Fair on Nov. 25, 26 & 27th from 10 to 5. It is a chance to buy directly from native artists and craft persons. There will be lots of holiday spirit and a big lighted tree. Unique gifts in every price range. Fine art, native crafts, regalia, cards, jewelry, t-shirts, coffee and more. Lots of snacks–frybread, baked goods, hot chocolate and more.  The Longhouse is located on West Marginal Way about 3/4 mile south of the West Seattle Low Bridge.

Free admission and parking for shoppers. Vendors call for table.

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Tool Library Hosts “Homemade for the Holidays” Workshop Series

Following in the spirit of The West Seattle Barter Fair this year, The West Seattle Tool Library will be hosting Homemade for the Holidays, a series of workshops on how to make hand crafted items for holiday giving. From soap making to homemade liqueurs, from basic jewelry design to easy canning, learn to make handcrafted goods at home in the spirit of a do-it-yourself holiday season.

All classes are held Tuesday evenings at the West Seattle Tool Library workshop at Youngstown Cultural Arts Center, 4408 Delridge Way SW.

Workshop Schedule:

Introduction to Holiday Canning: Nov. 29th, 7-9 PM

Learn how to preserve your harvest.  We’ll cover all the basics of using a hot water bath canner.  Each participant will get to take home a few jars of what we can in class.
Instructor: Christina Hahs
Cost: $20 plus $5 for materials
Register Here!

 

 

Introduction to Backyard Booze: Dec. 6th7-9 PM

Learn to use fruit and simple ingredients to make homemade specialty liqueurs such as Fig Bourbon, Rumtopf, Cranberry Spice Vodka, or Pineapple Rum.
Instructor: Vanessa Primer
Cost: $20
Register Here!

 

 

 

Introduction to Jewelry Making: Dec. 13th, 7-9 PM

Learn the basics of beading and 

wirework. Techniques learned include crafting clasps, wire wrapping and beading to begin creating a bracelet or necklace to complete at home.
Instructor: Jill Sundberg
Cost: $20 plus $5 for materials
Register Here!

 

 

 

 

Introduction to Soapmaking, Dec. 20th 7-9 PM

Homemade soaps make great gifts!  Join us as we demonstrate the basics of traditional soap making using all-natural herbs and essential oils. These are tried and true, simple methods you will be able to use at home. If there’s enough time, this class will also cover the basics of making bath salts, scrubs, teas, and oils.

Instructor: Vanessa Primer
Cost: $20 plus $5 for materials
Register Here!

 

“Capturing Your Rainwater” Class at The Community Orchard

How can you hold water in your landscape? It’s easier than you think! Find out how to harvest rainwater from your roof for use in your garden (or your whole house) and leave those rainbarrels behind! One option is cisterns: saves you money, conserves water, prevents stormwater pollution, remedies drainage issues. Learn how to keep your garden well watered in the dry summer months using free water!

This workshop will cover the basics and benefits of cisterns, the components of a cistern and how they work, how to customize a system for your landscape, and how to get started collecting your rain in a cistern or in the ground itself.

Presented by Nikola Davidson of EarthSystemsNW, a local company specializing in cistern installation for residential homeowners. www.earthsystemsnw.com  FREE

For more information on The Community Orchard of West Seattle, please visit their website: http://fruitinwestseattle.org/

Friends of Library Holiday Book Sale in Magnuson Park Hanger 30

Friends of the Seattle Public Library is a holiday sale  at Magnuson Park Saturday, Nov. 19, from 9 am to 5 pm.

More than 10,000 items will be available for sale, including holiday books, CDs, gift books and other items, and a general selection of fiction and non-fiction books. There will also be a large selection of quality children’s books. Hardbacks will sell for $2.00 and paperbacks for $1.00. Proceeds of the sale support The Seattle Public Library.

The sale is at Warren G. Magnuson Park, in the Workshop, Building 30, the street address is 7400 Sand Point Way NE, access is via Metro route #75.

Tool Library Hosts Sawhorse Revolution, Youth Carpentry Series

This autumn, The West Seattle Tool Library is proud to be hosting Sawhorse Revolution, a youth carpentry program that aims to bring the spirit of self-sufficiency and craftsmanship to the city during the school year.

Every Wednesday night, a handful of volunteer counselors gather for three hours in the Tool Library’s workshop, teaching wood-working skills to West Seattle highschoolers. Because this is the inaugural after-school event of Sawhorse Revolution, the theme of the 2011 pilot program is  “building a workshop” and the primary focus is basic joinery.

The students are learning how to shape their own mallets out of alder and then wield them, along with pull-saws, combination squares, and chisels, to design and cut mortise and tenon joints into table skirts and legs of clear fir. The Tool Library’s large collection of tools is being put to good use on hardwood unhesitatingly donated by the Blackstock Lumber Company of West Queen Anne.

Sawhorse Revolution is affiliated with the Rubicon Foundation, a Seattle-based 501(c)(3) that has hosted programs in carpentry, wood-working, and construction for Seattle youth from West Seattle, Chief Sealth, and Franklin high schools. Until now, all activities have been at the Smoke Farm, a former dairy situated along the Stillaguamish river in Arlington.

If you would like to know more about Sawhorse Revolution, the Rubicon Foundation, and the second iteration of the pilot program, due to appear mid-winter, please write to Kyle McCarthy Nunes and Maria Palomo at pilot@sawhorserevolution.org.

Energy Blog: Coal Export Ports Dumbest Thing We Can Do

Why building coal export ports in Washington is about the dumbest thing we could do

By Andy Silber

There are two proposals to build coal-export terminals in Washington: one in Longview and the other just north of Bellingham. Building these terminals is akin to building a road through a wilderness area to a bridge you just torn down. Washingtonians didn’t pass I-937 (the initiative that requires utilities to increase their use of renewable resources) so that we could export more coal to China. Our state legislature didn’t pass SB6001 (a law that prevents the building of new coal plants in Washington) so that we could keep the price of coal low for export. We enacted these laws so that the coal stays in the ground. As far as our atmosphere is concerned it doesn’t matter where the coal is burned. The idea of increasing our electricity rates (because coal is cheap, if you don’t count that it’s killing us) so that we can export coal to China so that they can sell more cheap stuff to us is totally nuts.

The world has been unable to pass a climate treaty that limits the emissions of greenhouse gases. The US never even ratified Kyoto. And that sucks. Despite that, we’ve made significant progress domestically:

  • Seattle and hundreds of other cities of signed on to the Mayors Climate Protection Agreement, committing those cities to meeting the Kyoto targets.
  • Most proposals to build new coal plants have died
  • Some older, dirtier and less efficient coal plants have been shuttered rather than being brought into compliance with clean air regulations
  • We’ve gotten commitments to switch some power plants away from coal in the future, including Washington’s only coal-fired power plant in Centralia
  • The wind and solar industries have seen remarkable growth
  • 2008 and 2009 both saw significant decreases in CO2 emission for the US. This was certainly partially due to the recession, but some of the changes are likely to be permanent (e.g. shuttering old coal plants)

We’re starting to get our own house in order, slower than we need to but the direction is good. The problem is that China is building a huge number of coal plants. Even though China has enormous deposits of coal, they can’t mine it fast enough. So they’ve gone shopping. Since the largest reserves of coal are found in the US (30% of proven coal reserves) it’s our coal that they want to buy. So if the US stops mining coal that limits how much damage can be caused by China burning coal. They’ll run out a lot sooner. Also, if China doesn’t have access to enough coal, they’ll have to stop building new plants.

If the US stays out of the international coal market the price of coal will go up (simple supply and demand). This will discourage the building of new plants and encourage the upgrading of existing plants to make them as efficient as possible. It will also encourage the construction of renewables and conservation/efficiency. We can’t force the Chinese to restrict their emissions of CO2, but we sure as hell don’t have to help them cook the world by selling them coal.

Some make the case for building these ports by talking about the jobs created. That argument makes no sense to me. No one talks about how the war on drugs hurts farmers in Columbia just trying to make a living selling coca. When we limit where strip clubs are located, what about the living-wage jobs that are killed? Should we encourage kids to drink more soda, since it will create jobs treating their diabetes and obesity? Jobs created doing a damaging activity are no boon to society. And exporting coal is certainly more damaging than a strip club.

So what can we do about it?

First off, don’t build the ports. We work with our federal, state and local elected officials to stop the construction of these exporter centers of death. We pursue every possible legal angle to tie these projects up for as many years as possible. We fight to include the climate impact of these ports in the environmental impact statements (EIS). Since coal burned in China is a significant source of air pollution in the US that should also be included in the EIS.

Secondly, we hit the rail lines. These enormous trains will be carrying toxic material through our neighborhoods. If a pickup carrying leaves needs to cover its load, it’s pretty obvious that a train carrying toxic dust needs to be covered. We work to pass legislation that requires the trains carrying coal to cover their loads.  There are legitimate health and environmental reasons to require this, but it also increases costs, and everything we do that increases costs makes it less likely that these projects will move forward.

Most importantly we organize. The Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal: Washington project is now working on coal exports. There’s a meeting at the UW campus on November 16th that isn’t a bad place to start.

Full Tilt White Center Hosting DubSea Bike Repair Day

Is your bike out of commission? Bring it to DubSea Bikes at Full Tilt Ice Cream, 9629 16th Ave SW, downtown White Center, on Sunday, November 13th, from 2:00 to 4:00 pm. This free event will focus on minor repairs to get more bikes on the street in White Center and beyond.  For more information contact Ellie Weiss at 860-1432 or elliep@uw.edu.

Cycling is great cardio exercise, without adding to climate change. It is inexpensive and fun and gives you a chance to interact with the world around you. Cycling builds community and strengthens the retail core. Bicycling provides young people from diverse communities with the means to explore their neighborhoods – and the neighborhoods beyond. Cycling is an enjoyable option, inclusive across generations and ethnicities for exercise, recreation, and transportation.

White Center can become a cycling destination. Relatively flat, with many inviting greenspaces (Steve Cox Memorial Park, Roxhill Park, North Shorewood Park), and bakeries (Salvadorean Bakery, 3.14, Seattle Roll Bakery, Del Castillo Pasteleria) this neighborhood has great potential for increasing cycling. New bike parking was installed by King County recently.

 

 

Roxhill Park Renovations & Skatespot Meetings Set

Seattle Parks and Recreation is holding separate design meetings for play area and skatespot projects at Roxhill Park,  Parks is encouraging the community to participate.

Seattle Parks and Recreation is hosting two public meetings on the Roxhill Park renovation project. The meeting focusing on the skatespot is Monday, November 14, and the meeting for the play area is Wednesday November 30. Both meetings begin at 6:00 pm at the Southwest Branch Library located at 9010 35th Ave. SW.

At the first meeting, Parks and California Skateparks will present the latest design for the skatespot. The community is invited to view and comment on the skatespot design. A skatespot is smaller than a full skatepark, but large enough to incorporate multiple skateboarding features. The skatespot is expected to be 8,000 square feet. For more information on Seattle skatepark planning please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/skatepark.htm.

At the second meeting, Parks will present the proposed design for the play area renovation for Roxhill Park and gather input from the community. Roxhill Park is located at 2850 SW Roxbury St. across from the Target side of Westwood Village, accessible by the #22 and #54 buses.

Funding for this renovation comes from the Parks and Green Spaces Levy that Seattle voters passed in November 2008. The $146 million, six-year levy provides acquisition funding for new neighborhood parks and green spaces and development funding for projects such as improved playfields, reservoir lid parks, renovated playgrounds, community gardens, and safety upgrades at city owned cultural facilities.

For more information on this project, please visit http://seattle.gov/parks/projects/roxhill/ or contact Parks Project Manager Kelly Davidson at 206-684-0998 or kelly.davidson@seattle.gov.

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