Help Permaculture Convergence – Offer Attendees Place To Stay

WANTED: Home Stays for Permaculture Convergence Attendees

The 2010 NW Permaculture Convergence is happening in our own back yard this year.

The Permaculture Convergence Organizing Committee is looking for West Seattle residents who are willing to host out-of-towners for the Convergence weekend, September 17-19.  If you have a spare bed, a fold-out bed, a floor for a sleeping bag or two, or even an outdoor tenting spot, please call or e-mail and let us know.  We have reserved Camp Long, but are concerned that we’ll need more space!

Permaculturists are not picky folks, so no need for anything fancy.  Please check the event online at http://www.nwpermaculture.org or email the Permaculture Convergence Organizing Committee directly at permaculture@earthlink.net.

City Light Improves Streetlight Repair, Online Tracker Now Up

Back in 2004 more than 23,000 streetlight outages were reported and sometimes it took months for a light to be repaired. City Council has made changes and now the backlog has been reduced to less than 1,000 outages and there is a policy in place to repair streetlights within 14 days of notification that they are out.

To see the existing outages and to report a streetlight outage, go to http://www.seattle.gov/light/streetlight/tracker.asp to see the map, report streetlight outages and to track their repair.

City Seeks Ideas for Historic Fire Station 37 Disposition

As you may be aware, the new Fire Station No. 37 is being constructed at 7700 – 35th Avenue SW, with completion projected in 2010. The Fire Facilities Levy approved by voters in 2003 planned that the original station property would be sold, and revenues from the sale directed towards Fire Levy projects. At this time, the Fleets and Facilities Department (FFD) is starting the disposition (sale) process. FFD is contacting residents and property owners within approximately 1,000 feet of the former fire station, interested parties and community groups to ask for citizen input before presenting a recommendation to the City Council regarding the disposition of the property. There will be several opportunities for public input throughout the process.

Fleets and Facilities invite your comments, suggestions, or recommendations about this property.   Comments are requested by August 13, 2010.   You may write or send a fax with your comments to the Fleets and Facilities Department, Attn: Louis Webster, PO Box 94689, Seattle, WA 98124-4689; FAX number 206-684-0525. You may call and speak with Louis Webster at 206-684-0357, or reach him by email at the following: mail#mce_temp_url#. Please be aware that any written comments will be made a part of the public record for the disposition of this property.

For more information about the City’s general property disposition procedure, please visit our website at http://www.seattle.gov/realestate/policydisposition.htm

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Murray Basin (Lowman Beach Park) Overflow Meeting Tonight

King County Wastewater Division has established a stakeholder group for discussing the options for the Combined Sewer Overflow project for the Murray Basin – located presently at Lowman Beach Park.  The proposals include some options which would necessarily have a huge and negative impact on Lowman Beach Park.  The stakeholder group, the Murray Basin Community Advisory Group, has been addressing these issues and concerns and is expected to work with the County to produce recommendations by the end of September.

All  Murray Basin Community Advisory Group meetings are open to the public to observe discussions. Info to date can be found at http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wtd/construction/seattle/beachcso/basins/murray/cag.aspx

The mission of the group is to:

  • Provide a forum for dialog and information sharing;
  • Consult with representatives of the community on the selection of a community acceptablealternative or suite of alternatives to reduce Combined Sewer Overflow episodes;
  • Provide advice, as community representatives, on potential solutions and ways to address community concerns and to advise King County on CSO solutions in the Murray basin;
  • Help King County make a stronger connection with the community;
  • Help King County provide information to the community so community memberscan provide meaningful input, help the County solve the serious problems of combined sewer overflows, and help the County reach a reasonable andtechnically feasible solution.

NBIS Eco-Hour Thursday in White Center

The Network for Business Innovation and Sustainability (NBIS) Eco-Hour is being co-hosted by NBIS members Graphics Plus and Rhizome Design and Images at Graphics Plus, 10007 13th Avenue SW, in White Center.RSVP to this website: http://ecohouraugust.eventbrite.com/

NBIS Eco-Hour is a popular social hour for NBIS members and friends. Each monthly Eco-Hour is hosted by an NBIS member company and provides an opportunity for members to showcase their companies and share a bit about their work. Eco-Hour emphasizes one of the values of NBIS: bringing people together across industries to get acquainted and learn from each other. NBIS Eco-Hours are scheduled throughout the year. Eco-Hours are free to NBIS members and $10 for non-members.

  • Rhizome Design and Images <http://www.rhizomdesign.com> is an integrated design and marketing company specializing in work for socially responsible and eco-friendly businesses, including NBIS. Owner, Jen Pennington and Photographer Bob Pennington also donate trees to ReLeaf Funds through AmericanForests.org through purchases of both custom and stock photography from their Rhizome Images <http://www.rhizomeimages.com> Collection. The Collection is a unique image resource for businesses and green technologies that feature the good, the bad, and the alternative in sustainability and industry.
  • Graphics Plus <http://www.graphicsplusseattle.com> is an independent, responsible printer offering craftsman quality offset and modern high-end digital printing. Owner David Hell will offer a tour of his shop, (recently retrofitted shop with new lighting through the Seattle City Light program) and talk about some of his newer investments, including chemistry-free plating equipment.

Together this design firm and print shop has been teaming up for over 14 years and employs practices that minimizes harm to the environment and gives back to the community.

Street parking is available and if the weather is nice, we’ll be able to open to open the doors and look out into the greenspace across the street. Delicious organic beer from Elliott Bay Brewing Company <http://www.elliottbaybrewing.com/> and sustainable and organic wine from Left Coast Cellars <http://www.leftcoastcellars.com/> will be served.

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Proposed Revision to Seattle Tree Regulations Now Online

The Department of Planning and Development’s proposal to revise Seattle’s Tree Regulations is now available at: www.seattle.gov/dpd/planning/SeattlesTreeRegulationUpdate/

These revisions are intended to advance the goals of the City’s Urban Forest Management Plan (UFMP), established in April 2007 to maintain and enhance a thriving and diverse urban forest. This proposal is a key element of the City’s overall strategy to implement the UFMP through a comprehensive strategy of regulations, education, incentives, and proper management of City-maintained trees.

Public comment on this proposal will be accepted until October 31, 2010, prior to the Mayor submitting his recommendations to the City Council in 2011. DPD will be presenting the proposal to stakeholder and community groups through August and Septembe

Groups interested in hosting presentations and discussions are encouraged to contact Moon Callison at moon.callison@seattle.gov or  by phone at 206-615-1486.

For more information about this Tree Regulations Update process, go to: www.seattle.gov/dpd/planning/SeattlesTreeRegulationUpdate/.

For more information on city-wide tree efforts and the Urban Forest Management Plan, go to: www.seattle.gov/trees/.

Restore Our Waters Campaign Includes Beer Coasters

The Restore Our Waters Initiative now includes coasters which will be distributed to area businesses to help get the water quality public education campaign out in the community where we eat and drink.

Information is coming to a coaster near you!

Want to learn about water quality in our region and what you can do to help improve it? You won’t have to look any farther than the bottom of your glass .

Join the City of Seattle and community partners for the unveiling of our “Puget Sound Starts Here” (caution – annoying Flash beginning) beverage coasters, a new water quality education campaign.

Thanks in part to a grant from the Puget Sound Partnership, the coasters are being distributed by community partners to restaurants, bars, and cafes in The Piper’s, Thornton, and Longfellow Creek watershed neighborhoods. These fun and colorful messages will provide an opportunity for Seattle residents to learn what they can do to improve the health of local waterways and Puget Sound every time they lift a glass.

30,000 coasters will be distributed; they describe four actions that will help reduce pollution: picking up after your pet, preventing automotive leaks, not using pesticides and fertilizers in your yard, and planting more trees. All the coasters share the same message on back: In Seattle, 46,000 storm drains carry untreated runoff directly to our waterways.

Puget Sound Starts Here (caution – annoying Flash beginning) is a regional public education effort to promote best practices that will reduce the impacts of stormwater runoff on Puget Sound. With participation from approximately 60 municipalities and support from the Puget Sound Partnership, the coalition launched the media campaign Puget Sound Starts Here. For more information, please visit www.pugetsoundstartshere.org (caution – annoying Flash beginning).

Seattle’s Restore our Waters Program, led by Seattle Public Utilities, is an ongoing commitment to take actions and promote partnerships that protect and improve our creeks, lakes, the Duwamish River, and Puget Sound. For more information, please visit www.seattle.gov/restoreourwaters.

The Coaster Campaign was funded through a mini-grant from the Puget Sound Partnership. Partners include Seattle Public Utilities, Seattle Parks and Recreation, Carkeek Watershed Community Action Project, Homewaters Project, Thornton Creek Alliance, and Longfellow Creek Watershed Council.

12th Annual Arts in Nature Festival @ Camp Long

Mark your calendars for the 12th annual Arts in Nature Festival, scheduled for Saturday Aug. 21st & Sunday Aug. 22nd at Camp Long!

It will be a weekend packed with arts and outdoor experiences for people of all ages and from all walks of life.

Festival goers will have access to a wide-range of performing arts including:

  • Music
  • Dance
  • Aerial & fire performances
  • Puppetry
  • Marching bands;

And, visitors will also get to experience sound & visual art installations in the

  • Museum of Sound
  • Interactive arts activities such as Haiku
  • Printmaking
  • EcoRhythm Instrument Building
  • Fabric Animals & Birds
  • Participatory Chime Clusters and
  • Naturalist activities.

Music will range from jazz and classical to bluegrass, indie and experimental. Some of the festival highlights include performances by Hey MarseillesEarth, Lelavision, and Pearl Django.

As a benefit show during the festival, Chris Ballew will be performing songs of the Presidents of the United States of America (tickets $25) on Sunday evening.

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Have An Opinion on Seattle’s Nightlife Initiative?

The City of Seattle is soliciting feedback and input from the public on the Seattle Nightlife Initiative. Please spend a few minutes filling out this survey and express your thoughts.

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/seattlenightlifeinitiative.  The initiative includes the following elements:

  1. Code compliance enforcement – Develop an assistance and enforcement strategy with nightlife businesses.
  2. Flexible liquor service hours – Develop a proposal for flexible liquor service hours.
  3. Noise ordinance enforcement – Adopt streamlined noise ordinance rules targeting chronic offenders.
  4. Security training requirements – Require regular SPD security training classes as part of the state’s Nightclub Liquor License approval and renewal.
  5. Precinct community outreach – Regularly scheduled precinct community outreach with nightlife businesses and residents.
  6. Professional development – Develop and encourage the adoption of best practices for nightlife businesses.
  7. Late-night transportation alternatives – Create accessible and safe late-night transportation options.
  8. Targeting public nuisances – Create a city ordinance to allow Seattle Police greater ability to manage patrons of nightlife establishments contributing to public nuisances, disturbances and disorderly conduct.